Category «Diet / Gene Interaction»

A gene variant that leads to increased sweets consumption and decreased fat (Patreon post)

Is it possible to eat more sweets and have a decrease in fat? A new study recently published in the journal Cell shows a genetic link to having a sweet tooth, but this sweet tooth gene comes with a nice twist: it causes a slight decreased in fat mass. I may have to dub this the …

Are you at a higher risk for diabetes? Check your TCFL72 variants

Type-2 diabetes affects about 9% of the US population and millions other world-wide. In those over age 65, one in four people has type-2 diabetes. While the overall numbers are a bit staggering, it is interesting to note that the peak for new cases was in the ’90s with a decrease in cases from 2005-2017.[ref] …

Meat consumption, colon cancer, and your genes

The link between colon cancer and meat consumption has been trumpeted by vegetarians and heatedly refuted by paleo fanatics. My question, as usual, is: “What role does genetics play?” The World Health Organization includes processed meat on their list of probable carcinogens, based on several large epidemiological studies. According to the American Cancer Society, the lifetime …

Weight Loss: Optimizing your diet based on your genes

Diet gurus, talking heads on TV, government food pyramids, and your friend who lost 20 pounds… What do they all have in common?  They all know the perfect diet that will whip you into shape and make you feel good. If that diet doesn’t work for you?  Well, you must have been cheating. You didn’t …

Salt and High Blood pressure: Genes Make a Difference (Patrons only)

Salt: Is it good for you? Or is it putting you at risk of high blood pressure? There is an interesting new book out by Dr. James DiNicolantonio called The Salt Fix that makes the argument that the experts got it wrong as far as the salt and blood pressure connection goes.  In contrast, the …

Why Allegra may not work as well for you: genetics of ABCB1 proteins (Patrons only)

Ever wonder why a certain medication may work great for a friend and do nothing for you?  One reason could be your genes. Let’s take fexofenadine (Allegra) for example.  You have watery eyes and a drippy nose during spring allergy season and pop an Allegra.  There is a lot that goes on in your body …

Biohacks – Experiments and Optimizations Based on My Genetics

After three years of digging into genetics and learning all that I can about my genes, I wanted to get a little personal and share a few things that have worked for me. I would also love to hear back from all of you.  Leave a comment below or comment on the Facebook page if …

Intriguing Genes: Do you taste what I taste?

Ever wonder why some people don’t like Brussel sprouts or strong, dark coffee?  I love a good, dark roast, cup of coffee, and Brussel sprouts and cabbage taste great.  It turns out that I can’t taste the bitter compound in them, but the majority of people can. On the other hand, I have yet to find a …

Lactose Intolerance: The genetics of not producing lactase

Are you a milk drinker? Does pouring a cold glass of milk sounds good? Your genes control whether you are likely to produce lactase as an adult, and it is easy to check your 23andMe or other genetic data to see if you are likely to enjoy a big glass of milk. Personally, I had always …

Intriguing Genes: Differences in how we smell things

Learning about genetics has given me a new perspective on so many different subjects.  For example, seeing first-hand how much of a difference the right vitamins and minerals make in a person’s mood due to changes in their neurotransmitter balance has made me much more understanding.  Cut me off in traffic?  Instead of just assuming you …