Everyone knows that aspirin protects against heart disease, right?

Well, it turns out that aspirin may only protect some people from heart disease, and for others, it can actually slightly increase the risk of heart disease.  It all seems to depend on a variant of the COMT gene.

Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is the gene that codes for an enzyme that breaks down dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, as well as other substances.  There are many studies on the common genetic polymorphisms of the COMT gene, and most of the studies focus on the neurological aspects of the enzyme.

study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association looked at the effect of a common COMT polymorphism on cardiovascular disease.  The study also looked at the combined effect of the variant along with either aspirin or vitamin E and cardiovascular disease.

The study was done on women only, included 23,000 participants, and analyzed the incidences of cardiovascular disease over a 10 year period.  It looked at the COMT Val158Met polymorphism, rs4680, where Val is the same as the G allele and Met is the same as the A allele. Those with homozygous Val/Val variant (GG) have approximately a 4 times faster rate of dopamine metabolism as those with the Met/Met variant (AA).[ref]

The findings of the cardiovascular disease study show that women with the Val/Val (GG) variant are naturally at a lower risk of cardiovascular disease than those with the Met/Met (AA) allele.

The study also showed that taking aspirin (100mg every other day) or Vitamin E (600 IU alpha-tocopherol every other day) significantly reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease for those with the Met/Met (AA) allele.  The opposite was true for women with the Val/Val (GG); they actually had a higher risk of cardiovascular disease with aspirin supplementation and no protection from Vitamin E.

Check your 23andMe results for rs4680:

  • GG:  naturally at a slightly lower risk of heart disease; aspirin supplementation increased the risk for heart disease[ref]
  • AG: in the middle for heart disease risk, no significant effect on heart disease from aspirin
  • AA: generally higher risk for heart disease; both aspirin and vitamin E significantly decreased the risk for heart disease

 


Lifehacks

Talk with your doctor about this one, especially if you are already on aspirin therapy.

If you are looking for an inexpensive aspirin without a lot of extra ingredients,  here is one that has only starch added to it.

While the study used only alpha-tocopherol as the Vitamin E supplement, many recommend using a natural, mixed tocopherol if supplementing with Vitamin E.

 

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4 Comments

Donna · May 1, 2017 at 5:52 pm

I am COMT rs4680 AA. I am interested in supplementing with aspirin. Is there any reason why I couldn’t take 50mg daily as opposed to 100 every other day?

Patsy Kravitz · July 6, 2018 at 3:30 am

Is there any feedback about an A/G combination? Many thanks!

Sarah Cummings · August 21, 2018 at 10:54 pm

I agree! Before taking any medication, we must consult our doctor first. Our health might be in danger if we take a risk without any consultation.

Genetic Lifehacks | COMT – Genetic Connections to Neurotransmitter Levels · July 7, 2015 at 11:08 am

[…] COMT and Heart Disease […]

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