Histamine Intolerance and Your Genes

Genetics plays a big role in how well your body breaks down histamine. You can use your genetic data to figure out if your genes are part of the reason why you have histamine intolerance. Knowing which genetic variants you carry leads to targeted solutions that are more likely to work for you.

Low Histamine Smoothie Bowl

It can be difficult sometimes to come up with new breakfast ideas for a low histamine diet. Here is a recipe for a low histamine smoothie bowl for a quick breakfast. (Member’s article)

Low Histamine Salsa Recipe

On a low histamine diet and craving salsa and tortilla chips? Here is a quick recipe for a low histamine salsa using roasted red peppers instead of tomatoes.

Low Histamine Mint Shake

Looking for low histamine treats? Here is a mint shake recipe low in histamines, and an excellent source of luteolin, a mast cell stabilizer.

High histamine levels

High Histamine, MTHFR, and the Methylation Cycle

Genetics plays a role in how well your body breaks down histamine. Histamine that is out of balance with the body’s ability to break it down can cause symptoms that are collectively known as histamine intolerance. Discover how to check your genes that are involved with histamine levels.

IL13 Genomics: Elevating Th2 Immune Response

Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a signaling molecule important in the immune response. Excessive IL-13 can tip you towards a Th2 dominant immune response, and variants increase the risk of allergies and asthma.

quercetin

Quercetin: Scientific studies + genetic connections

Quercetin is a natural flavonoid acting as both an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. This article focuses on the results of clinical trials involving quercetin and links to specific genetic topics. Using your genetic data, you can make a more informed decision on whether quercetin is worth trying.