The ITGB3 Gene: What does it do?

ITGB3 Gene Description:

From MedlinePlus.gov:

The ITGB3 gene provides instructions for making the beta3 subunit of a receptor protein called integrin alphaIIb/beta3 (αIIbβ3), which is found on the surface of small cells called platelets. Platelets circulate in blood and are an essential component of blood clots. The beta3 subunit attaches (binds) to the alphaIIb subunit, which is produced from the ITGA2B gene, to form integrin αIIbβ3. It is estimated that 80,000 to 100,000 copies of integrin αIIbβ3 are present on the surface of each platelet.

During clot formation, integrin αIIbβ3 binds to a protein called fibrinogen. Attachment of integrin αIIbβ3 from adjacent platelets to the same fibrinogen protein helps platelets cluster together (platelet cohesion) to form a blood clot. Blood clots protect the body after injury by sealing off damaged blood vessels and preventing further blood loss. Integrin αIIbβ3 can also bind other proteins on platelets and in the blood as well as proteins within the intricate lattice that forms in the space between cells (extracellular matrix) to ensure proper clot formation and promote wound healing.

 

Genetic Lifehacks articles that include ITGB3 variants (SNPs):

ITGB3: Heart attack risk – with a positive tradeoff

Will Aspirin Prevent Heart Disease?

ITGB3: Heart attack risk – with a positive tradeoff

 


About the Author:
Debbie Moon is the founder of Genetic Lifehacks. Fascinated by the connections between genes, diet, and health, her goal is to help you understand how to apply genetics to your diet and lifestyle decisions. Debbie has a BS in engineering and an MSc in biological sciences from Clemson University. Debbie combines an engineering mindset with a biological systems approach to help you understand how genetic differences impact your optimal health.