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MTHFR Mutation: What is it? How to check your raw data.

The MTHFR gene is important for how your body utilizes folate (vitamin B9) for creating neurotransmitters, detoxifying toxicants, and maintaining a healthy heart. Check your 23andMe or AncestryDNA data for the MTHFR C677T and A1298C variants.

Oxalates, Kidney Stones, Joint Pain: Green Smoothies and Your Genes

Green smoothies have been a health fad for quite a while now, but these health drinks can be a double-edged sword for some people due to their high oxalate content. Find out if you are genetically prone to kidney stones and what to do about it.

Genetics and Vitamin B12

There are several genes that can influence your absorption, transport, and need for vitamin B12. Some people need higher amounts of B12, and some people thrive on different forms of B12. Take a look at your genetic data to see if you should up your intake of B12.

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), MTHFR, and Genetics

Riboflavin, or vitamin B2, is an essential cofactor for many biological pathways. Learn how to check your genetic raw data to see if you may need more riboflavin.

BChE gene: Nightshade sensitivity, Anesthesia risk

Genetic variants of the BChE gene decrease its enzyme’s activity. This can lead to various and seemingly unconnected consequences…such as an increased risk for Parkinson’s or food sensitivity to potatoes.

Creatine: Boosting Muscles and Increasing Brain Power

Creatine is an amino acid used in muscle tissue and the brain for energy in times of stress. Genes play a role in creatine synthesis. Find out what the research shows about creatine supplements for muscle mass and cognitive function.

Biotin Deficiency: Check your Genes

Biotin, also known as vitamin B7 or vitamin H, is a cofactor that aids in the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. Biotin deficiency due to diet is pretty rare, but there are genetic variants that can increase your risk for biotin deficiency or insufficiency.

Lactose Intolerance Genes

Your genes control whether you are likely to produce lactase as an adult. Check your 23andMe or other genetic data to see if you are likely to enjoy a big glass of milk.

Tryptophan Pathways: Kynurenine, Serotonin, and Melatonin

Tryptophan is an amino acid that the body uses to make serotonin and melatonin. Genetic variants can impact the amount of tryptophan that is used for serotonin. This can influence mood, sleep, neurotransmitters, and immune response.

Vitamin C: Nutrigenomics, transport, and genetic deficiency

Like most nutrients, our genes affect how vitamin C is absorbed, transported, and used by the body. It can influence your risk for certain diseases and make a difference in the minimum amount of vitamin C you need to consume each day.

Zinc genes: The healing power of zinc

Learn why zinc is important for your immune system and so much more. Find out how your genes impact your need for zinc and discover ways of boosting your zinc status. 

CBS Gene Variants and Low Sulfur Diet

Some clinicians recommend a low sulfur diet for people with CBS mutations. Find out what the research shows – and why that recommendation is not backed up. (Member’s article)

Selenium and Your Genes

Selenium is a trace element found in certain foods. Learn how selenium is used in the body, why it is important, and how genetic variants can make someone more susceptible to problems with a selenium-deficient diet.

FADS1 and FADS2: Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids

We all vary in how well we convert the plant-based omega-3 oils into the DHA and EPA that our body needs. Some people are really poor at this conversion and thus should either eat more fish or consider taking a DHA / EPA supplement. Learn more about how your variants might affect your health.