Asparagus Pee: Genes and Odor Detection

Can you smell asparagus in your pee? It is a smell that is inescapable, overwhelming, and unique. Right? Well, some people actually have no idea how pungent it can be.

Dyslexia – Genetic Connections

While dyslexia is known to run in families, the role of genetics in dyslexia is still being determined. Here is a quick look at some of the genes thought to be involved in dyslexia, affecting around 10% of the population.

ABCC11 gene

ABCC11 gene: Ear wax and no body odor

The ABCC11 gene determines both the type of earwax a person has and their armpit odor. Learn more about how a change in a single spot in the DNA of this gene can cause the gene not to function.

Genetics of Double Eyelashes

Elizabeth Taylor stood out in many ways – in part because of her thick lashes. Turns out a genetic variant is the likely source of her double row of lashes. Learn more about this variant and its other associated risks. (Member’s article)

Tools for Hacking Your Health

Optimizing your health pays dividends in so many ways, and it is worth putting in a little time to prevent chronic illnesses like diabetes or heart disease. But it doesn’t have to be difficult! There are many cool tools available today to make figuring out your diet or understanding your sleep easy options to try for health management. (Member’s article)

how your taste receptors shape your food choices

Taste Receptors: Bitter, sweet, and much more

Ever wonder why some people don’t like Brussel sprouts or strong, dark coffee? Some people love a good, dark roast, cup of coffee – and Brussel sprouts and cabbage taste just great. Genetic variants in the taste receptor genes mean that we taste things differently.

Genetics of Red Hair

To have red hair, you need to carry two variants in the MC1R gene. We all know our hair color, but it turns out that if you carry one MC1R genetic variant (and don’t have red hair) you are still at an increased risk for skin cancer.

Traits Topic Summary

Utilize our Traits Topic Summary Reports with your 23andMe or AncestryDNA genetic data to see which articles may be most relevant to you. These summaries are attempting to distill the complex information down into just a few words. Please see the linked articles for details and complete references. (Member’s article)

Wrinkles and Age Spots

Some people age naturally with beautiful looking skin. Others slather on creams and odd gunk in a futile battle to chase away wrinkles and age spots. What is the difference? Genetics and environmental factors, of course.(Member’s article)

Will you go bald? Genetics and baldness

What causes male pattern baldness? A combination of genetics, nutrition, and environmental toxins come together to form the risk factors for baldness. But genetics really seems to rule the roost here.