The FGG Gene: What does it do?

FGG Gene Description:

From MedlinePlus.gov

The FGG gene provides instructions for making the fibrinogen gamma (γ) chain, one piece (subunit) of the fibrinogen protein. This protein is important for blood clot formation (coagulation), which is needed to stop excessive bleeding after injury. To form fibrinogen, the γ chain attaches to the fibrinogen A alpha (Aα) and fibrinogen B beta (Bβ) chains, each produced from different genes. Two sets of this three-protein complex combine to form functional fibrinogen.

For coagulation to occur, another protein called thrombin removes a piece from the Aα and the Bβ subunits of the functional fibrinogen protein (the pieces are called the A and B fibrinopeptides). This process converts fibrinogen to fibrin, the main protein in blood clots. Fibrin proteins attach to each other, forming a stable network that makes up the blood clot.

Genetic Lifehacks articles that include FGG variants (SNPs):

Elevated Fibrinogen: Risk factor for blood clots


About the Author:
Debbie Moon is the founder of Genetic Lifehacks. Fascinated by the connections between genes, diet, and health, her goal is to help you understand how to apply genetics to your diet and lifestyle decisions. Debbie has a BS in engineering and an MSc in biological sciences from Clemson University. Debbie combines an engineering mindset with a biological systems approach to help you understand how genetic differences impact your optimal health.