News and Research: Melatonin supplementation reduces COVID-19 susceptibility

Study Title: A network medicine approach to investigation and population-based validation of disease manifestations and drug repurposing for COVID-19    PLOS Biology  Nov. 2020

Overview: This study looked at a number of different genes, interactions, medications, and comorbidities as related to SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19.  It was a good sized study, with data from over 26,0000 people included.

The study found that supplemental melatonin usage reduced the likelihood of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The researchers took into account a number of different variables (race, age, usage of other medications) and the results remained significant.

From the study: “We found that melatonin usage was associated with a 28% reduced likelihood of a positive laboratory test result for SARS-CoV-2 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.72, 95% CI 0.56–0.91; Fig 8A) after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking history, and various disease comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, and COPD) using a propensity score (PS) matching method.”

Beta-blockers may also help prevent getting SARS-CoV-2: “We found that carvedilol use was significantly associated with a reduced likelihood of a positive laboratory test result for SARS-CoV-2 (OR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.56–0.97) after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking history, and various disease comorbidities. ”

Why is this important:  A 30% reduction in SARS-CoV-2 infections just from taking melatonin at night is incredible. Melatonin is available over the counter, is inexpensive, and has a lot of benefits in addition to protection against COVID-19.

Melatonin levels decrease dramatically as we age due to the calcification of the pineal gland. Young people naturally have higher levels of melatonin, which makes me wonder if this is part of the reason they are less susceptible to SARS-CoV-2.

People often mention that melatonin doesn’t work for them…  I’ve found that melatonin in the timed-release formula that better mimics the body’s natural production. More is not always better, and timed-release formulas in the 300 mcg to 1 mg range may work well for people who feel groggy the next morning after taking a large dose of melatonin.

 

More to read: 

 

More in News and Research…



Author Information:   Debbie Moon
Debbie Moon is the founder of Genetic Lifehacks. She holds a Master of Science in Biological Sciences from Clemson University and an undergraduate degree in engineering from Colorado School of Mines. Debbie is a science communicator who is passionate about explaining evidence-based health information. Her goal with Genetic Lifehacks is to bridge the gap between the research hidden in scientific journals and everyone's ability to use that information. To contact Debbie, visit the contact page.