The F2 Gene: What does it do?

VDR Gene Description:

From MedlinePlus.gov:

The F2 gene provides instructions for making a protein called prothrombin (also called coagulation factor II). Coagulation factors are a group of related proteins that are essential for normal blood clotting (hemostasis). After an injury, clots protect the body by sealing off damaged blood vessels and preventing further blood loss.

Prothrombin is made chiefly by cells in the liver. The protein circulates in the bloodstream in an inactive form until an injury occurs that damages blood vessels. In response to injury, prothrombin is converted to its active form, thrombin. Thrombin then converts a protein called fibrinogen into fibrin, the primary protein that makes up blood clots.

Thrombin is also thought to be involved in cell growth and division (proliferation), tissue repair, and the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis).

Genetic Lifehacks articles that include F2 variants (SNPs):

Prothrombin: Blood Clot Risk

Nattokinase and Lumbrokinase: Natural fibrinolytics

Elevated Fibrinogen: Risk factor for blood clots

7 genetic variants that increase your risk of blood clots


About the Author:
Debbie Moon is the founder of Genetic Lifehacks. Fascinated by the connections between genes, diet, and health, her goal is to help you understand how to apply genetics to your diet and lifestyle decisions. Debbie has a BS in engineering and an MSc in biological sciences from Clemson University. Debbie combines an engineering mindset with a biological systems approach to help you understand how genetic differences impact your optimal health.