Aspirin, colon cancer, and genetics

For some people with specific genetic variants, aspirin may help to prevent colon cancer. Learn more about what the research says and check your genes.

Melatonin: Key to Health and Longevity

More than just a sleep hormone, melatonin is at the heart of many health topics. Your genetic variants play a big role in the production of melatonin. Learn how your lifestyle and diet interact with your melatonin-related genes.

The genetics of high triglycerides

High triglycerides are linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Both genetics and diet combine to elevate triglyceride levels. Learn how your genes interact with what you eat to lower your triglycerides.

Building Up Iron: Hemochromatosis mutations

A couple of common mutations can cause you to build up iron, leading to iron overload or hemochromatosis. It is one genetic disease where knowledge is really powerful – you can completely prevent hemochromatosis through blood donations.

alzheimer's

Alzheimer’s Genes: Understanding APOE

The APOE gene variants are tightly linked with the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Find out whether you carry the APOE risk type for Alzheimer’s – and learn what all of us can do via diet and lifestyle to prevent this disease.

Gallstone Genes

The genetic link to gallstones centers around the genes involved in regulating the absorption of cholesterol from plants and the excretion of cholesterol from the body. Learn more about the genetic variants that increase your risk.

HIF-1a: Hypoxia, Cancer, and Athletic Superpowers

The hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF1A) gene codes for a transcription factor, that responds to the amount of oxygen available to the cell. This is important in cancer prevention, and several HIF1A genetic variants alter the susceptibility to several types of cancer.

Genetics and Cavities: Check your 23 and Me data

Are your cavities caused by genetics?

It turns out that genetics plays a larger role here than you would think. It is estimated by researchers that the ‘heritability’ or genetic component of dental caries is about 50%. (Member’s article)

Gingivitis and Your Genes

You brush, you floss, and your gums still bleed… perhaps you carry some of the genetic variants associated with gingivitis? Check your genetic data to see. (Member’s article)

Chronic Lyme: Genetic susceptibility

The interesting thing about Lyme disease is that the genetic variants you carry impact both how the disease affects you and how well antibiotics work for you. Learn whether your genetic variants are linked to post-treatment Lyme disease symptoms such as joint pain. (Member’s article)

back pain

Back Pain and Your Genes

For some people, back pain is a daily occurrence that drastically affects their quality of life. For others, it may be an intermittent nagging problem, often without rhyme or reason. Your genes play a role in whether disc degeneration gives you back pain.

CRISPR Babies and HIV Resistance

Did you know that some people are resistant to HIV? People who carry two copies of the CCR5 delta-32 mutation are resistant to *most* strains of HIV. (Still not something to test out!) Check your genes to see if you carry this mutation.

Genetics and Type 2 Diabetes

Not all type 2 diabetes risk is from what you eat… Genetics plays a big role in diabetes. Learn more about your genetic susceptibility.

Type 2 Diabetes Protection from Lower PUFA

A genetic variant in a gene that regulates mitochondrial biogenesis (creation) along with a low PUFA diet can decrease diabetes 2 risk. Learn more about this connection and check your data.

Osteoporosis Genes and Prevention Strategies

Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease facing many of us as we age. Genetics plays a big role in susceptibility to osteoporosis. The good news here is that knowing where your genetic susceptibility lies can lead you to targeted, personalized solutions for osteoporosis. (Member’s article)

diabetes

Type II Diabetes – Genetic Connections

The genes involved in increasing risk for type-2 diabetes indicate some of the variations in causes: insulin release, metabolic syndrome, response to sugar, and zinc deficiency. Knowing how you are genetically susceptible to diabetes may help you to modify your diet appropriately.