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Leaky Gut Genes: Emulsifiers in Processed Foods

Emulsifiers, found in many processed and packaged foods, can trigger an inflammatory response in the intestines based on whether you carry specific genetic variants.

Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF), Genes, symptoms, solutions

Familial Mediterranean Fever: Mimics fibromyalgia, arthritis, inflammation

Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a genetic condition of inflammatory episodes that cause painful joints, pain in the abdomen, or pain in the chest. It is most often accompanied by a fever. FMF is often misdiagnosed as various pain-related conditions such as fibromyalgia, myofascial pain syndrome, or gouty arthritis.

Low IgA and Selective IgA Deficiency

Partial IgA deficiency, which affects up to 1% of the population, can have a genetic component and overlaps with some autoimmune diseases.

Fluoride: Understanding Its Effects on Health

Discover the pros and cons of fluoride for dental health and overall wellness, its sources, toxicity levels, and how genetics influence fluoride sensitivity.

Genetics of Mannose-Binding Lectin Deficiency

Mannose-binding lectin, also known as mannose-binding protein, is involved in the body’s innate defense against infections. Find out how genetic variants in this system increase your susceptibility to specific pathogens.

Sjogren’s Syndrome: Causes, Genes, Solutions

Are you dealing with dry eyes and dry mouth? Sjögren’s syndrome is an autoimmune disorder that affects moisture-producing glands. Discover the underlying causes of Sjögren’s syndrome and the genetic variants that increase susceptibility.

IL-13: Elevating Th2 Immune Response and Asthma risk

Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a signaling molecule important in the immune response. Excessive IL-13 can tip you toward a Th2-dominant immune response, and variants increase the risk of allergies and asthma.

Lactose Intolerance Genes

Your genes control whether you are likely to produce lactase as an adult. Check your 23andMe or other genetic data to see if you are likely to enjoy a big glass of milk.

Tryptophan Pathways: Kynurenine, Serotonin, and Melatonin

Tryptophan is an amino acid that the body uses to make serotonin and melatonin. Genetic variants can impact the amount of tryptophan that is used for serotonin. This can influence mood, sleep, neurotransmitters, and immune response.

GABA: Genetics, Anxiety, and Immune Response

GABA (gamma-Aminobuyteric acid) is a neurotransmitter that acts to block or inhibit a neuron from firing. It is an essential way that the brain regulates impulses, and low GABA levels are linked with several conditions, including anxiety and PTSD.

Mercury Detoxification: Genomics and Solutions

What are the physiological effects of mercury and how does the body eliminates it? Discover how genetic variants play a role in how quickly you excrete mercury.

Arsenic detoxification and your genes

Arsenic exposure occurs via well water, in certain foods, and through breathing. This article covers the pathways the body uses to get rid of arsenic, and it includes information on genetic variants that may impair the detoxification of arsenic.

Celiac Genes: How to Check Your Raw Data

Celiac disease is caused by a combination of environmental factors (eating gluten, other factors) and having the genetic variants that cause susceptibility to the disease. Without the genetic susceptibility, you won’t have celiac.

Elevated Fibrinogen: Risk factor for blood clots

Fibrinogen is a protein that is essential for creating blood clots when you get a wound. But higher levels of fibrinogen are a major risk factor for heart disease and DVT. Learn how your genes impact your fibrinogen level.

Is IBS genetic? Targeted solutions, based on your genes

There are multiple causes of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and genetics can definitely play a role in IBS symptoms. Pinpointing your genetic cause may help you to figure out the right solution for you. (Member’s article)

FUT2: How to check if you are a secretor or non-secretor?

A genetic variant in the FUT2 gene controls whether or not you secrete your blood type into your saliva and other bodily fluids, such as your intestinal mucosa. This alters the gut microbiome – and protects you from Norovirus.