Our genes make us unique in lots of ways — one of which is how we absorb and utilize vitamins and minerals from our food.

Take, for example, eating carrots to get your daily vitamin A. Some people are great at converting beta-carotene, the precursor to vitamin A in vegetables,  into the form of vitamin A that the body uses. Other people carry genetic variants that make that conversion process difficult.

Instead of wondering, you can simply check your genetic data to see which form of vitamin A is best for you.


Recent articles on Vitamins and Minerals:

Lithium: A mineral that affects mood, Alzheimer’s disease, obesity, and telomeres - I’ve written before on the topic of supplemental lithium orotate for mood, anxiety, and irritability. (Read the previous article here: A little lithium and B12 makes the world a happier place — for some.) What about Read more…
Shining Genetic Light on Your Vitamin D Levels - Vitamin D is essential to so many processes in the body! It isn’t actually a vitamin at all, but a prohormone that is synthesized in the skin using cholesterol in a chemical reaction with UVB radiation Read more…
Building Up Iron: Check your genes to see how iron affects your health - Hemochromatosis is a fairly common genetic disease that causes iron to build up in the body. Knowing that you carry the genetic variants for hemochromatosis can literally add years to your life since you can Read more…
Thiamine – Genetic Variations in Need for B1 - Thiamine (thiamin), also known as vitamin B1, is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as a cofactor in the metabolism of carbohydrates, branch chain amino acids, and fatty acids.  It is essential and needed in the Read more…
Supplements for Methylation and More… - I have ended up a cabinet full of bottles of all kinds of supplements!  Every time I learn about something new — methylfolate for MTHFR polymorphisms, hydroxycobalamin for MTRR polymorphisms, vitamin A because I don’t convert Read more…
Vitamin C Levels and Your Genes - As the weather here turns colder, thoughts turn to preventing colds and the flu.  My “go to” method of preventing sickness has always been by loading up on vitamin C, even though recent studies haven’t Read more…
Your need for riboflavin (B2): MTHFR, and other genetic variants - Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin that is a cofactor for many enzymes in the body.  To put it in simpler terms: riboflavin is vitally important! Riboflavin is a ribose sugar bound to a Read more…
Genetics of Biotin Deficiency - Biotin, also known as vitamin B7 or vitamin H, is a cofactor which aids in the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins.  Biotin deficiency due to diet is pretty rare, but eating raw egg whites Read more…
MTHFR, Depression, and Homocysteine Levels -   An interesting study came out this year in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.  The study, Correlation of Clinical Response With Homocysteine Reduction During Therapy With Reduced B Vitamins in Patients With MDD Who Are Read more…
A Little Lithium + B12 may make the world a happier place - depending on your #genetic snps. A little lithium and B-12 makes the world a happier place – for some. - It is funny sometimes, looking back on the journey you take to discover something new and personal to your health. Of all the lessons that I’ve learned from reading through thousands of research studies on Read more…
Hemochromatosis – Genes involved - Hemochromatosis is a genetic disorder in which the body stores too much iron.  Normally, a person absorbs about 8 – 10% of iron that they eat, but a person with hemochromatosis can absorb up to Read more…
Vitamin E, Genetics, and Inflammation - Vitamin E is an antioxidant that is often promoted as a supplement that prevents cardiovascular disease and that prevents the oxidation of LDL cholesterol. It is an essential nutrient found in a variety of foods including wheat Read more…
How Well Do You Convert Beta-Carotene to Vitamin A? - Everyone knows that carrots and sweet potatoes are great sources of vitamin A, right? Well…  it turns out it isn’t that straightforward for everyone. The beta-carotene in orange fruits and vegetables has to be converted Read more…
The Link Between Vitamin D, MS, and Your Genes - Many researchers have speculated that there must be a link between Vitamin D and multiple sclerosis (MS) based on the distribution of cases at certain latitudes. There are increased numbers of MS cases in areas Read more…


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