Checking Your Carrier Status for Genetic Diseases

The term “carrier status” when applied to a genetic disease usually means looking at whether or not you are heterozygous (have one copy) for a mutation that causes a Mendelian genetic disease. While genetic information from 23andMe or a similar DNA test is generally accurate, always re-confirm with a clinical test before making a major health decision. Your results on these variants could be a false positive or a false negative. (Member’s article)

Dyslexia – Genetic Connections

While dyslexia is known to run in families, the role of genetics in dyslexia is still being determined. Here is a quick look at some of the genes thought to be involved in dyslexia, affecting around 10% of the population.

Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is an “inborn error of metabolism” which impairs the body’s ability to break down medium-chain fatty acids for fuel. Learn more about this metabolic disorder.

DHEA and Your Weight

DHEA is a hormone that does a lot in the body – including influencing muscle mass and weight. This quick article examines just one aspect of DHEA: how it affects our weight. But the genetic variants included here also impact other impacts of DHEA in the body. (Member’s article)

FTO: The ‘fatso’ gene & weight loss options

The FTO gene is nick-named the ‘fatso gene’ because of its association with obesity. This article digs into the current research on the FTO gene and then will give you some science-based options for controlling your weight if you carry the FTO genetic variant.

UCP2 Gene: Weight Loss Lifehacks

Turning up the heat on your metabolism is the job of UCP2. It plays a role in energy production, metabolism, and inflammation. Learn more about your UCP2 variants that can play a role in a higher BMI.

Osteoporosis Genes

Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease facing many of us as we age. Genetics plays a big role in susceptibility to osteoporosis. The good news here is that knowing where your genetic susceptibility lies can lead you to targeted, personalized solutions for osteoporosis. (Member’s article)

Type II Diabetes – Genetic Connections

The genes involved in increasing risk for type-2 diabetes indicate some of the variations in causes: insulin release, metabolic syndrome, response to sugar, and zinc deficiency. Knowing how you are genetically susceptible to diabetes may help you to modify your diet appropriately.