Welcome to Genetic Lifehacks

What if you could know the best foods and lifestyle modifications that fit you, personally and genetically?

Genetic Lifehacks is all about looking at research studies, checking your genetic data (from 23andMe or elsewhere), and then figuring out how to apply the information to your life through diet and lifestyle changes.

It’s all about educating yourself, taking responsibility for your health, and experimenting with diet and lifestyle to find your best options. The time is now. New research comes out daily. You can make decisions and act to optimize your health.



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Recent Articles

  • Circadian Rhythm Connections, Part 2: Weight Loss and Meal Timing - There are five key elements to weight loss from a circadian point of view: Timing of Meals; Light Exposure; Sleep; What to Eat, When; and Genetic Variants.  All of these can come together in our modern world to give you a propensity to gain weight – and all can be hacked to help you lose ...
  • Circadian Rhythm Connections: Part 1 – Mood Disorders - Roosters crowing at the first crack of daylight. Morning glories unfurling their blooms as the sun rises in the sky. Lightning bugs flickering just as dusk falls. Most people intuitively understand that plants respond to sunlight, using photosynthesis to produce energy and store sugar during daylight.  It is easy to also apply the thought of ...
  • Are you allergic to grass pollen? It may be genetic. - Spring is in full force here, and with it has come the need to dust off the lawnmower.  As the smell of fresh cut grass fills the air, many people also know the feelings of watery eyes, runny noses, and itching everything. Speaking of smelling the grass… Did you know that some people can’t smell the ...
  • Serotonin: How your genes affect this neurotransmitter - Serotonin… most of us think of the commercials with happy brain neurons bouncing the serotonin molecule between them. Turns out that there is a lot more to this molecule than most of us realize. About 90% of serotonin is made in the gut and regulates motility there.[ref] Serotonin is also involved in various other bodily ...
  • Lithium: A mineral that affects mood, Alzheimer’s disease, obesity, and telomeres - I’ve written before on the topic of supplemental lithium orotate for mood, anxiety, and irritability. (Read the previous article here: A little lithium and B12 makes the world a happier place — for some.) What about the effects of lithium as a mineral supplement on other aspects of health? In reading studies on a wide range ...
  • Gulf War Illness: Genetic susceptibility and current research - A question from a patron via Patreon prompted me to look into the link between genes and Gulf War Illness. I wanted to share what I found in case it can help other veterans who are dealing with the aftereffects of their service to our country during the Gulf War. The Dept. of Veteran Affairs ...
  • The ‘redhead’ gene - I remember in high school learning about Punnet squares; people with brown hair had the dominant hair color gene and red hair was recessive. It turns out that it isn’t nearly as simple as having a red hair gene or a brown hair gene. Nor is there a blue eye gene — seems like my ...
  • A gene variant that leads to increased sweets consumption and decreased fat (Patreon post) - Is it possible to eat more sweets and have a decrease in fat? A new study recently published in the journal Cell shows a genetic link to having a sweet tooth, but this sweet tooth gene comes with a nice twist: it causes a slight decreased in fat mass. I may have to dub this the ...
  • Growing up ‘big boned’: MC4R gene and obesity - There are several key players in our body’s regulation of hunger, satiety, and energy expenditure. Leptin and ghrelin are two pivotal hormones involved in our desire to eat. Within that leptin pathway, another key regulator of our body weight is MC4R. This explanation is going to get a bit complicated, so for all of you ...
  • Are you at a higher risk for diabetes? Check your TCFL72 variants - Type-2 diabetes affects about 9% of the US population and millions other world-wide. In those over age 65, one in four people has type-2 diabetes. While the overall numbers are a bit staggering, it is interesting to note that the peak for new cases was in the ’90s with a decrease in cases from 2005-2017.[ref] ...
  • Hacking BDNF for weight loss (Patreon only) - Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a fascinating growth hormone that does a lot in our brains. So what does BDNF do? Quite a bit! It is involved in supporting neurons and neuronal growth in the brain; it also plays a role in long-term memory and in obesity. Why focus on obesity when everyone knows that ...
  • Leptin Receptors: Genetics and Hunger - Ever wished your body could just naturally know that it has had enough food and turn off the cravings for donuts or Doritos? Your body is actually supposed to work that way. Leptin, a hormone produced mainly by fat cells, signals to the hypothalamus in the brain that you have enough stored energy. Leptin is ...

 

Read more:
Diet X Gene Interactions
Disease Prevention